Taiwanese Dong Ding Oolong

  • Taiwanese Dong Ding Oolong - click to enlarge
  • Taiwanese Dong Ding Oolong - click to enlarge
  • Taiwanese Dong Ding Oolong - click to enlarge
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    NOTES:pound cake
    raspberry
    peppercorn
    corn bread
    flax
    cactus
    No Longer Available

    This tea is no longer available and has been archived. There are no current plans to offer it again in the future.

    This Dong Ding exemplifies the union of sweet and savory flavors that are a hallmark of Taiwanese oolong craftsmanship. . . .

    Taiwanese oolong is an incredible and worthwhile counterpoint to the Tieguanyin growing cross the straights in Anxi. While mainland oolongs tend to be more floral, Taiwanese oolongs edge towards savory. In love with the unique taste, we are pleased to have found this standout example despite difficult growing conditions in Taiwan this past year.

    The wet leaf aroma is like being in a small bakery with rising whole wheat walnut currant bread in the oven and redwood bark’s warm smell wafting though an open window. The first steepings start with a bright raspberry tartness followed by a darker note of flax and spicy green peppercorn. These initial flavors swell and then diminish leaving a sweet whipped cream pound cake aftertaste.

    Later steepings expand upon the spicy flavor with the sweetness of red bell peppers and the savory satisfying taste of fried cactus paddle. The aftertaste moves towards sweet corn bread and lingers long after the tea is gone.

    Date of Picking:Spring 2012

    Location of Picking:Nantuo County, Taiwan

    What Was Picked:Large young leaves, picked, shaken, wilted, oxidized, pan fired, and rolled

    Quantity Acquired:10 lbs currently available

    Sourcing Agent(s):Wang Huimin


    Brewing Hand Picked Spring Tieguanyin, a similar rolled oolong tea

    Western Brewing
    Use 4g of tea (about 1T) in 6-8oz of fresh-boiled (205°F) filtered or spring water.  Steep for 30 seconds in a brew basket or equivalent. Enjoy many infusions.  Add 10-15 seconds with each steeping, or to taste.
    Lighter oolongs can be sensitive to very hard tap water.  Try to use a large brew basket or steep the leaves loose to allow them to fully unfurls and infuse the optimum flavor.

    Gongfu Style Brewing
    Use 5-7g of tea for a 4-5oz gaiwan.  Pour boiling water into pot and immediately pour out into pitcher.  Pour this rinse over the pot and cups used.  The rinse helps open the leaves up slightly for the first infusion.  Steep for 3-6 seconds each infusion, and enjoy at least 18 infusions.  Increase time as the tea starts to get lighter.  If you don’t have special equipment, just use pyrex cup measure, a small mug, or any vessel around 4oz.  Pour through a strainer if you have one, or use a fork to stop the leaves from pouring into your cup.

    Iced Tea (Cold Brewing)
    Use about 4 grams of tea for every 12oz of water.  Combine with room temperature water in a covered vessel and refrigerate for 8-12 hours.  Enjoy!

    Iced Tea (Flash Chilled)
    Use 1TB (5 grams) of tea in a 6-8oz vessel.  Steep for 30 seconds with filtered boiled water.  Fill a martini shaker (or equivalent) with ice, then add brewed tea and shake until well-chilled (usually 10-30 seconds). Pour out through martini-shaker top over fresh ice in a new glass and serve.

    Terroir and Tea Part 1: Landscapes Influence on Flavor

    "How does unique terroir of Taiwan's Nantou county influence the flavor of this oolong, and how much is in the hands of the farmers and craftsmen who process the leaves?...

    The First Ingredient in Tea

    "The water that you use will carry the flavor of the tea, but it will also carry its own flavor. No tea can turn bad water into good water...

    Improvisational Gong Fu Tea

    "No gaiwan? No problem! Learn to enjoy gong fu tea at home with tools you already own....

    FREE SHIPPING on all orders as low as $49 in the United States and Canada.
    FREE SAMPLE included with every order.
    Share this Tieguanyin. May it bring people the same joy it brings me when I brew it for good company.... Wang Huimin,
    Anxi Tieguanyin Master